Popular Tours & Trips In Iceland

Founded in 1786, Reykjavik is the world’s northernmost capital of a sovereign state, and the heart of Iceland’s cultural, economic and governmental activity. The location of Icelands’ first permanent settlements, Reykjavik dates back to AD 874+/-2 when Ingólfur Arnarson sailed in from Norway. Reykjavik, which loosely translates to Smoky Bay, is said to have been inspired by the billowing steam plumes from the many hot springs in the region. Today, powered by its’ renewable geothermal- and hydropower energy resources, Reykjavik is green, clean, and amongst the safest cities in the world. Located on the south-west shore of Faxaflói bay at 64°08′ latitude, Reykjavik has a sub-polar oceanic climate, yet temperatures very rarely drop below −15 °C (5 °F) in winter, because the Icelandic coastal weather is moderated by the North Atlantic Sea Current, an extension of the Gulf Stream. Foreign-born individuals make up around 10% of its’ total population of 200,000 +/- with inhabitants of ca 100 different nationalities making Reykjavik their home today. The city’s coastal location makes it prone to wind and gales are common in winter. Cool summers rule with temperatures fluctuating between 10 and 15 °C (50 and 59 °F), rarely exceeding 20 °C (68 °F). Reykjavik receives around 1,300 annual hours of sunshine, comparable with other places in Northern and North-Eastern Europe. Highest recorded temperature in Reykjavík is 25.7 °C (78 °F), recorded on July 30, 2008, whith the lowest ever recorded temperature at −19.7 °C (−3 °F), recorded on January 30, 1971. Public transportation consists of a bus system, which runs through the city outskirts and connects the city to the rest of Iceland.  Read more

The Southern Peninsula Reykjanesskagi or Reykjanes, (Icelandic: Suðurnes) is a region in southwest Iceland on a peninsula situated at the southwestern end of Iceland, near the capital of Reykjavík. Reykjanes is where Leifur Eiríksson Air Terminal and KEF International Airport, the major point of entry for Iceland is located at the former American military base in Keflavík as well as the Blue Lagoon health spa, close to Grindavík. The region has a population of more than 22,000 and is as such one of the more densely populated parts of the island. Its administrative centre is Keflavík, which merged several years ago with nearby town of Njarðvík to create Reykjanesbær, the second largest settlement outside Greater Reykjavík area with a population of 14,231 in 2014.

The peninsula is marked by active volcanism under its surface, and large lava fields, allow for little vegetation. There are numerous hot springs and sulphur springs in the southern half of the peninsula, around the Kleifarvatn lake and the Krýsuvík geothermal area with a geothermal power station at Svartsengi. Close to the power station a swimming pool has been installed making use of the hot and mineralized water coming down from the power station known throughout the world as the Blue Lagoon (Icelandic: Bláa Lónið). Close by is ‘The Bridge Between Continents’ Lucky, a bridge that spans the Álfagjá rift valley (60 feet wide and 20 feet (6.1 m) deep) near Grindavik, connecting Europe and North America on the boundary of the Eurasian and North American … Read more

The ring road from Reykjavík goes south through the region from west to east through most of the population centers and quickly leads you into South Iceland, and tering from Reykjavík, you also have the alternative of taking the road through Thingvellir National Park, the historic meeting place of the Alþingi general assembly, a joint parliament and court founded in 930 where, on the 17th of June 1944, Iceland was declared a republic. South Iceland’s charm lies in its many large and impressive waterfalls, glaciers, unique geology and fascinating medieval history.

The area is the setting of some of Iceland’s most popular sagas and home to many of the heroes of Njáls saga, largely set in Fljótshlíd near Hvolsvöllur. The south contains the other important seat of power of medieval Iceland, namely Skálholt, location of the first bishops of Iceland. Skálholt and the seat of a diocese covering east, south and west Iceland until it moved to Reykjavík in 1799. The eastern part of South Iceland is dominated by Vatnajökull glacier, the water systems of which have regularly created large flood planes along the southern coast.

The southern coastline from Þorlákshöfn in the west to Höfn in the east contains an almost unbroken sand beach open directly to the treacherous Atlantic Ocean and has practically no natural harbours, the exception being man-made Landeyjahöfn, the ferry central for the … Read more

An area of extremes, North Iceland is characterized by wide bays and deep fjords surrounded by mountains on two sides and long river-shaped valleys on the third. Situated between the West Fjords and the East Fjords on either side, a region of diverse and incredible natural beauty, thundering waterfalls, dramatic canyons, scenic fjords, rivers, lakes and striking volcanic features, the North is Iceland in miniature.

The rugged mountains of Tröllaskagi, many capped by small glaciers, and the extraordinary contours of the mountains will strike you, as the absence of forest or woodland gives you a tremendous view of the horizon at all times, yet also leaves you exposed.

The almost desert-like landscapes and colors in the sky that you have never seen anywhere else project an openness, subtlety and ephemeral quality to the light, the way it changes throughout the day, an atmosphere that completely captures your imagination.

Akureyri is an important centre for art and commerce, and many of the smaller villages, with Grímsey sitting on the Arctic circle, offer the experience of rustic, rural Iceland steeped in deep traditions of farming and fishing. Read more

A 550km strip of secluded beauty covering eastern and south-east Iceland with breathtaking fjords, some uninhabited and others with quaint fishing villages, the East Fjords are one of the oldest regions in Iceland, shaped by glaciers during the Ice Age. Each with its own flair and touch of grandeur, they take in a quarter of the country’s coastal fringe plus some rugged highlands and a sizeable chunk of Vatnajökull, Europe’s largest glacier.

Höfn in Hornafjördur is the main town in the southeast, and further west is the tiny settlement of Kirkjubæjarklaustur, the jumping-off point for several trips inland, the best of which takes you through the fallout from Lakagígar, one of Iceland’s most disastrous eruptions and wild Lónsöræfi reserve.

A largely infertile terrain of highland moors, coastal gravel deserts and alluvial sands contrasts with narrow fjords, jagged peaks, toppling waterfalls, geothermal hotspots, lush forests and endless green valleys are home to the wild and natural habitat of Iceland’s reindeer population.

Vopnafjördur, Bakkafjördur and Seydisfjordur mirror each other with their adorable, impressive old houses from around a century ago and Hallormsstadaskogur is an impressive forest in a country otherwise almost barren of trees. Read more

A peninsula in northwestern Iceland on the Denmark Strait, the Westfjords face the east coast of Greenland. Their high steep mountains, deep fjords and valleys were carved by the ice age glaciers over16 million years ago. With birds like puffins, eagles, arctic terns and arctic foxes, this is where Iceland’s dramatic landscapes come to a riveting climax as mass tourism disappears, with only about 10% of Iceland’s visitors ever seeing the region. Jagged bird cliffs and broad multihued dream beaches flank the south, and rutted dirt roads snake north along jaw-dropping coastal fjords and over immense central mountains.

Reykhólar and Barðaströnd on the shore of the south coast of the Westfjords, are characterized by many bays separated by high mountains and narrow stretches of coastal lowland and, in many places, sheer cliffs. Located north of the peninsula, Drangajökull is the fifth largest glacier of Iceland and close by, the cliffs of the longest bird cliff in the northern Atlantic Ocean, Látrabjarg, are home to millions of breeding puffins, guillemots, razorbills, kittiwakes and fulmars.

Jökulfirdir and Hornstrandir are home to cairn-marked walking paths revealing bird life, arctic foxes and ocean vistas crowns the quiet region. A nature reserve protecting birds, wild flowers and the exclusive arctic fox with abandoned villages farms and churches being restored … Read more

A peninsula in northwestern Iceland on the Denmark Strait, the Westfjords face the east coast of Greenland. Their high steep mountains, deep fjords and valleys were carved by the ice age glaciers over16 million years ago. With birds like puffins, eagles, arctic terns and arctic foxes, this is where Iceland’s dramatic landscapes come to a riveting climax as mass tourism disappears, with only about 10% of Iceland’s visitors ever seeing the region. Jagged bird cliffs and broad multihued dream beaches flank the south, and rutted dirt roads snake north along jaw-dropping coastal fjords and over immense central mountains.

Reykhólar and Barðaströnd on the shore of the south coast of the Westfjords, are characterized by many bays separated by high mountains and narrow stretches of coastal lowland and, in many places, sheer cliffs. Located north of the peninsula, Drangajökull is the fifth largest glacier of Iceland and close by, the cliffs of the longest bird cliff in the northern Atlantic Ocean, Látrabjarg, are home to millions of breeding puffins, guillemots, razorbills, kittiwakes and fulmars. Jökulfirdir and Hornstrandir are home to cairn-marked walking paths revealing bird life, arctic foxes and ocean vistas crowns the quiet region. A nature reserve protecting birds, wild flowers and the exclusive arctic fox with abandoned villages farms and churches being restored by descendants of those who once lived there, they are reached by boat from Isafjordur municipality or  … Read more

At 400–500 m Interior Highlands are where man has never made his home and is still a rare visitor and for centuries, the interior of Iceland was virtually inaccessible, playing host only to outlaws in hiding. Mostly an uninhabitable volcanic desert in a surface of grey, black or brown earth, lava and volcanic ashes, The highlands are nature is still at its rawest, an untamed mingling of rocky deserts, jagged peaks, volcanoes, ice caps, valleys, steaming hot springs with glaciers, deserts of black sand, barren glacial moraine, active and extinct volcanoes and strange oases of vegetation.

Highland favorites include the area around Mt. Askja, where you can bathe in a naturally warm lake called Viti (Hell), and Kverkfjoll high-temperature geothermal field on the rim of Vatnajokull. Surrounded by obsidian and colorful rhyolite mountains visitors can bathe in natural hot rivers in the geothermal area of Landmannalaugar, and Laugavegur trail leads to the woodland nature reserve Þórsmörk, a hidden valley surrounded by mountains, glaciers and glacial rivers. Overland routes Kjolur and Sprengisandur link the north and south and Kjolur is passable by ordinary vehicles in summer, skirting Langjokull glacier on the way to Hveravellir geothermal field before emerging by the Ring Road in the north. Sprengisandur route consists of rough tracks trails and un-bridged rivers that can only be negotiated by big 4WD vehicles, a difficult route that threads its way between glaciers to come out southeast of Akureyri, near Lake Myvatn. Read more

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